Jacques Fadat
Jacques Fadat: 40 years of creativity which have enabled the ancestral art of Aubusson to be reborn

Olympe de Gouges tapestry
Olympe de Gouges tapestry
Jospéhine Baker
Jospéhine Baker

Jacques Fadat is the author of more than 380 projects woven in Aubusson tapestry. From the Suite of Human Rights (1987 ) woven from Richard Texier's works, supported by the State and by private sponsors, to the project of Olympe de Gouges ( 2007), he has restored honour to the great art of woven tapestries, whose ultimate splendour had been left by Jean Lurçat with The Song of the world.

His inspirations have a common theme evoking historical images of the major humanist movements. One of the most recent projects, Olympe de Gouges, is especially dedicated to great women who made history: Olympe de Gouges, Joséphine Baker, Louise Weiss, etc.  

These 17 tapestries represent 17 articles of the "Declaration of women's rights and of the citizeness " drafted in 1791 by this great revolutionary who pleaded not only for women rights, but for the equality of all people by their actions against slavery. 

This work and Jacques Fadat's orientations reflect an excessive passion for intelligence and humanity. Another creation dating back to the turn of the century, plunges us into the progress of the Compostelle pilgrims. Using pilgrims' testimonies, he imagines the stages of a pilgrimage to Compostelle in a suite of flamboyant landscapes of the South, 27 tapestries called the Threads of Compostelle (2000).

TheThreads of Compostelle 

Brightness of water
Brightness of water
Grand Seal of the United States, Paris City Hall
Grand Seal of the United States, Paris City Hall

This artistic investment, a mirror of great reflections of our time, using this environment, had already been expressed in the 1990s in Brightness of water, realised in partnership with the Nicolas Hulot Foundation and the artists Gast Michel and Rico Sequeira.

He pursues his affection for History and the personalities who were part of it, the territories which they travelled through, by weaving their coats of arms: that of Mary Stuart of Scotland, of the cities of Marseille, of Saint Raphaël, of Saumur, etc. Jacques Fadat uses this ancestral and nomadic language, the art of the weaving - known for thousands of years, from South America to the Near East and the Indian continent - to the universality of its matter using world-famous themes. 

Aubusson weaving becomes the sumptuous vector of great names: such as the arms of Ferrari or even the coat of arms of Canard-Duchêne champagne. But it is in 1983, at the conclusion of the weaving of the Grand Seal of the United States (adapted from the work of the specialist in heraldry, Francis de Vallée), that another adventure is born, under the auspices of Franco-American friendship. Jacques Chirac, the then mayor of Paris, offers this work -still exhibited to the White House- to President R. Reagan. 

Canard-Duchêne
Canard-Duchêne

"To understand woven art, trying to understand humanity in its time and space"